SOHEIL YASREBI

I am a software engineer in San Francisco, I worked on self-driving car technology, social media platforms when it was cool (circa 2012 at Twitter), and founded a few startups. I also twitter from time to time @soheil.

By Soheil Yasrebi July 30, 2019

The other day I was trying to kickstart our marketing campaign by going on Facebook and browse Facebook pages about "radio shows" to find people who are active in those communities. The goal was to find a few of those people for every radio show we're trying to market to, a support group if you will. Since they'd be clearly interested in that specific radio show they'd have good incentive to tell us what features we should build for the radio show websites that we're launching. This however involves a lot of brain cycles and back and forth to 1. find those people to begin with 2. establish a persistent dialog with them. Not something scalable if there is only one of you, namely just you! who understands this concept. Odesk is great and I use it a lot to get leads, to manage my automaton-like marketing campaign tasks like sending tweets, writing blog posts (not this one clearly), posting targeted marketing material (aka crap) on the internet, what-have-you. This specific task is, however, is way beyond them. I had them do slightly brain-incentive tasks and result was constant catastrophic failure or CCF.

I realized most stuff on Odesk falls into trivial cheap work category, and smart people don't want to do trivial tasks, definitely not trivial tasks that are not highly paid. Therefore that's why you won't find smart people on Odesk, pretty obvious, I know (also if you work for me and are reading this, I'd like to take this opportunity to say: "this does not apply to you! and thank you for your work, bye.") Now the trick is to get smart people do those trivial tasks namely 1 & 2 above without much pay. Look at Twitter, pretty dumb product, 140 characters, yet 3,000 of the best engineers are working on that, I worked there I know (thought @soheil was just a hap?) Give smart people lots of money and equity (more equity in the case of Twitter, at least in the early days) or have people believe in your sub-standard product, it helps if people are emotionally attached and your product is somehow involved in that. It also helps if your product has to do with major things like gay rights or the Arab Spring. Forget minimum viable product (MVP), democracy inducing product (DIP) is the new kid on the block.

SOHEIL YASREBI

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